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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:20 am 
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Current ride: S1w X1 1125CR
Location: NNW of Sarfampton
Can't imagine why Haynes never did Buell manuals lOl

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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:21 am 
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Location: Pig On The Wall Country
I love my LC Haynes manuals :cry:

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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:35 pm 
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Current ride: XB9R
Location: Havant
deepsix wrote:
Can't imagine why Haynes never did Buell manuals lOl


Deepsix,

Its worse than you think:

Image

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 3:31 am 
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Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 10:42 pm
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Current ride: rusty 3-speed pedal
Location: Montauk
With any good manual, you also need a good list of tools. Here is one from Peter Egan, of Road & Track magazine:

TOOL AND THEIR USES

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it whirls like a lawnmower blade, smacking your coffee across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted tractor part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint and rust off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench at the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls and hard-earned wrenching calluses in about the time it takes you to say, "Ouch!"

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age but can also be used to scratch painted sheet metal in random patterns as you attempt to drill a hole.

PLIERS: Used to grip objects with not quite enough force. Also used to round off bolt heads and give you a mighty pinch when they slip off.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Used to round off bolt heads too but with much greater results. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub you want the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older British cars and motorcycles. They are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for the last 15 minutes but just can't part ways with because you harbor a silly belief that someday you may actually use them.

BREAKER BAR: As the name implies, used to break sockets and extensions, not for loosening stubborn bolts and nuts as one would think.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake pads, effectively trapping the jacks handle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2x4: Used for levering an automobile upward off a hydraulic jack handle.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbors to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack or more sockets.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing those tiny metal splinters that cannot be seen with the naked human eye but can cause enough discomfort for you to try anyway.

GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise. Used mainly for getting dog doo off your boot.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool ten times harder than any known drill bit that snaps off in bolt holes you couldn't use anyway.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the tensile strength on everything you forgot to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: Really, it's large pry bar that coincidentally has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end opposite the handle.

TIN SNIPS: See hacksaw.

TROUBLE LIGHT: The home mechanic's own tanning booth, sometimes called a drop light. It is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars. Health benefits aside, it's main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips head screws.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by an unusually stiff hose to a Chicago Pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty bolts over tightened 58 years ago by someone named Hank, and quickly and neatly rounds off their heads.

PRY BAR: A tool used to mangle the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts not far from the object you are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard boxes delivered to your front door. Works particularly well on contents such as seats, tarps, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, pension checks, antiques, and expensive rubber or plastic parts.

TORQUE WRENCH: Used to tighten bolts to a desired setting but continues to do so even after you have removed the wrench so that in the future you find it now requires more torque to remove that said bolt than what the wrench could have ever supplied.

FLASHLIGHT: Device used for storing dead batteries.

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We do not need the help of our friends so much as confidence that they will help us when we need it. –Epicurus


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 10:38 am 
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Current ride: 98 S1W
Location: Perth, not the Scottish one
3/8" DRIVE TO 1/2" SOCKET ADAPTOR: Educational Aid based on the stick and carrot principle. Ingenious device that shears off and permanently retains 3/8" ratchet heads. In the short term this forces you to walk ALL the way round to other side of the bike to get the right ratchet for the job. In the long term it encourages you to invest in a better quality socket set :oooops:


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 12:29 pm 
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Current ride: S1w X1 1125CR
Location: NNW of Sarfampton
You only need two tools in life; WD40 and Gaffer tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD40
If it does move and shouldn't use Gaffer tape.


If you can't fix something with a hammer .........you've got an electrical problem.

Ok 3 tools then :oooops:

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I'm a Hornithologist, I get excited by exotic birds.........


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 2:58 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 06, 2009 7:40 pm
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Current ride: 2008 ULY XT
Location: L - Imgarr , Malta
deepsix wrote:
You only need two tools in life; WD40 and Gaffer tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD40
If it does move and shouldn't use Gaffer tape.


If you can't fix something with a hammer .........you've got an electrical problem.

Ok 3 tools then :oooops:



Ok ....I am confused D6 ....can't see any of them working beneath the waves ? ;) - well maybe the hammer !

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........next ?


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:45 pm 
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Current ride: 98 S1W
Location: Perth, not the Scottish one
FEI-LO wrote:
Ok ....I am confused D6 ....can't see any of them working beneath the waves ? ;) - well maybe the hammer !


The WD40 is to squeeze into his wetsuit, and the gaffer tape is to keep his chum in the decompression chamber quiet :P


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 06, 2009 4:03 pm
Posts: 4326
Current ride: S1w X1 1125CR
Location: NNW of Sarfampton
Duct tape works fine underwater, half the North Sea is held together by duct tape and tie wraps.
Sledge hammer is the tool of choice for adjusting and 'talking to' big things.

Bet that German tourist wishes she had a lump hammer in Egypt instead of a fluffy towel on the deckchair.

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I'm a Hornithologist, I get excited by exotic birds.........


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:17 pm 
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Current ride: S1w X1 1125CR
Location: NNW of Sarfampton
I'm still in the office in St Johns writing procedures, luckily I can order equipment and tools.
Using the old formula; if you need a tool get 5
Divers will use 1, steal 1, break 1, lose 1 (and 1 for the ex diver in the office ;) ) No wonder the price of oil is so high lOl

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I'm a Hornithologist, I get excited by exotic birds.........


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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:57 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 06, 2009 4:47 pm
Posts: 4788
Current ride: '98 S1
Location: Wessex
deepsix wrote:
I'm still in the office in St Johns writing procedures, luckily I can order equipment and tools.
Using the old formula; if you need a tool get 5
Divers will use 1, steal 1, break 1, lose 1 (and 1 for the ex diver in the office ;) ) No wonder the price of oil is so high lOl


lOl lOl
Every time that I go to Puerto Rico, my first purchase is about $400 worth of Sears tools, to replace the ones that are missing from the locked chest that we keep on site.
I've been doing this most trips, for the last five years. :headbang:

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 Post subject: Re: interpret manuals
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2012 8:06 am 
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Needs more cowbell
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Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:09 am
Posts: 9011
Current ride: None
Location: Southampton
I would get a couple to take home too!

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